Six-storey rental building proposed to replace four century-old Grandview-Woodland houses

A rezoning proposal for Grandview-Woodland envisions replacing four single-family homes on Grant Street, which were built between 1908 and 1912, with a six-storey apartment building featuring 38 secured market rental units.

The application, which is being considered under the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan, involves an assembly of properties from 1535 to 1557 Grant St.

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  • 1535 Grant St.: This one-storey home was built in 1909. There is no sales history in the last three years, according to BC Assessment, which doesn’t include any sales made this year. The property was assessed at $1.4 million as of July 1, 2017.
  • 1545 Grant St.: This one-and-a-half-storey home was built in 1910. The last sale listed by BC Assessment in its most recent assessment roll was $1.7 million in February of 2017.
  • 1549 Grant St.: This one-storey home was built in 1908. The last sale listed by BC Assessment was $1.4 million in January of 2016.
  • 1557 Grant St.: This one-and-a-half-storey home was built in 1912. The last sale listed by BC Assessment was $1.5 million in January of 2016.

 

Four homes are on the proposed redevelopment site.
Four homes are on the proposed redevelopment site on Grant Street.

 

An open house about the proposed project runs from 5 to 8 p.m., Sept. 11, at Britannia secondary school.

Stuart Howard Architects is the architectural firm involved. The proposal includes 22 bachelor or one-bedroom, eight two-bedroom, and eight three or four-bedroom units.

The zoning for the area allows for four storeys and up to six storeys for rental.

Aerial view from the southwest. Rendering Stuart Howard Architects
Aerial view from the southwest. Rendering Stuart Howard Architects

 

The redevelopment project was discussed at a Grandview-Woodland Area Council meeting last February before it was submitted as a rezoning application.

At that time, according to a write-up produced by longtime Grandview-Woodland resident Jak King, some neighbours were concerned about the loss of the old homes, the prospect that many of the units would only be one-bedrooms, and they worried about their affordability.

The applicant team and city staff will be at the open house to answer questions. An online feedback form can be found on the city website.

After the open house, city staff will analyze the feedback that’s received and consider it as part of the project review process.

noconnor@vancourier.com

@naoibh

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